Gardening 101: Quick Tips for Container Gardening

Posted by: on March 3rd, 2011 | 9 Comments
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Container Gardens are a fantastic way to add highlights of color throughout your outdoor living space. Just remember that these pots, containers and planters need a little bit different care than flowers you have planted in flower beds.

  • Mix time release feed into soil as you plant.
  • Water with liquid plant food at least every 2 weeks; more if you are using petunia and other heavy feeders
  • Prune when plants start to look weedy
  • Remove dead flowers to speed up new flowering
  • Soil mix should contain peat moss to better hold water
  • Water deeply – big drinks less often are much better for the plants than frequent light sprinkles.

Color planting tips:

  • Be brave with color – consider dramatically contrasting colors such as purple with yellow or orange and blue.  Contrasting colors can brighten a dark corner
  • Consider monochrome container, all white, all pink or all yellow
  • Pastels can “cool” an area. Think pinks and lavenders.

Check out our new lineup of planter, planting containers, plant pots and accessories for your patio.

 

Take a look at more of our Gardening 101 posts here on The Apron Blog.

Check out our Home Depot Forums, too, for gardening advice. Get your gardening questions answered by Home Depot gardening experts. We’d also love to hear your gardening stories–triumphs, tragedies and clever ideas.

You can also always speak to one of our Certified Nursery Consultants at your local Home Depot Store. He or she will be happy to give you gardening advice, point you to the right product or offer ideas how to make your garden a place of pride.

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  1. Stephanie Fleming says:

    Go to your local independent Garden center for answers to any of your gardening questions, for you home, deck or yard.. There you will be given advice that will work for you in your area by people the know what they are talking about.

  2. Melissa says:

    I’ve been trying my hand at deck gardening for the first time this year – I have a large concrete patio, facing west.

    I’ve been very successful at sprouting tomatoes, zucchini, even watermelon, but I am clueless when it comes time to transplant them into larger containers (if I sprout directly into the large containers, they die soon after).

    Help?! How do I move my sprouted plants into a larger container without killing them?

    • Jae Warren says:

      Hi Melissa,

      I wish I could answer your question directly (no green thumbs here), but I am confident that one of the helpful members of our Garden Club community is sure to have some useful advice for you on this matter. It’s absolutely free to join, and you’ll be able to get answers to your questions and expert advice, as well as engage with other gardening enthusiast. Hope this helps.

  3. Angela says:

    I’ve been doing container gardening for nearly 12 years. I use plastic garbage cans cut in half. You glue the lid of the garbage onto the top because you’ll be using it as the bottom of the top half. It gives you enough room for the roots and the veggies.

    I live in Savannah, GA and grow all my veggies in pots or whatever containers I can find. I live on a tidal creek that floods our yard at high tide so having a garden is out of the question. I grow melons, tomatoes, potatoes, radishes, lettuce, green peas, green beans, green and red peppers, hot peppers, squash and anything else you can think of. Herbs can be grown in a sunny window or even in a partial sunny window. I grow most of my stuff in the shade.

  4. Kaylen says:

    Kevin,
    I bought some succulents about 3-4 weeks ago. All of them seem to be doing well, except one. The ends of it seem to be vital, but the base and stems look like they are dead. There black and crumpled up. Should I consider it dead and rip it out, move it to a new pot, or just leave it be?

    • Jae Warren says:

      Hi Kaylen,

      Sorry for taking so long to reply to your question. I wish I could answer your question directly (no green thumbs here), but I am confident that one of the helpful members of our Garden Club community is sure to have some useful advice for you on what for your ailing succulents. It’s absolutely free to join, and you’ll be able to get answers to your questions from community experts, as well as engage with other gardening enthusiast. Hope this helps.

  5. Christen says:

    Kevin,
    If you are growing carrots or other root veggies, your container should be about 1 1/2 – 2 ft deep. The trick to containers is to make sure the root system has adequate space, fertilize every two weeks with compost tea, and keep up with watering. Its better to give the plants a good soak, then to give them a light watering more frequently. You can grow just about anything in a container, herbs do not need a deep container like carrots, they prefer to be left alone except for the occasional water.
    Cucumbers could be grown in a hanging basket and allowed to trail or put in a pot on the porch with a trellis for them to grow up.
    Zuchinni/summer squash does really well in containers. Most seed varieties offer a “good for container” or a smaller size plant, so be creative and have fun!
    The Salad Barrel:
    Plant a half barrel, growing leaf lettuce, radishes, other greens, or herbs and pick your salad all summer long.

  6. Kevin says:

    These are some good points. But I wish there was more. A lot of people live in apartments with balconies facing one direction (usually east or west in the southern states for A/C & Heat reasons). I would like more info on herbs & veggies grown in containers. Obviously not all of them can be, but upside down tomatoes are real popular lately, and most herbs can be grown in a window box.