Legislation of the Light Bulb

 
  • thomas_edison_img
    18791879
    Thomas Edison markets
    incandescent bulbs
  • 1901_img
    19011901
    Fluorescent lamps are created
  • 1980
    19801980
    LED devices appear
    around the country
  • 2007
    20072007
    The Energy Independence andSecurity Act legislation
    is created
  • 2014
    20142014
    Incandescent bulbs will
    be outlawed in the US
  • 1874
    18741874
    The first electric filament
    lamp is created
  • 1927
    19271927
    The light emitting diode
    LED is discovered
  • 1965
    19651965
    LEDs enter the
    United States market
  • 1989
    19891989
    First commercial LED is sold
  • 2009
    20092009
    The LED light bulb
    revolution begins

EFFICIENT LIGHTING LEGISLATION

Section 321: Efficient Light Bulbs, of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, established several measures that will have a major impact on the lighting industry during this decade.

Post-2014 Standards for General Service Lamps


Not later than January 1, 2014, the Secretary must initiate a rulemaking procedure to determine whether the legislated standards above should be amended to establish more stringent standards than the EISA standards; and the exemptions for certain incandescent lamps should be maintained or discontinued based, in part, on exempted lamp sales collected by the Secretary from manufacturers.

The rulemaking is not be limited to incandescent lamp technologies; and must include consideration of a minimum standard of 45 lumens per watt for general service lamps.

If the Secretary determines the 2012-2014 standards should be amended, the Secretary is obligated to publish a final rule not later than January 1, 2017, with an effective date that is not earlier than 3 years after the date on which the final rule is published.

If the Secretary fails to complete a rulemaking or if the final rule does not produce savings that are greater than or equal to the savings from a minimum efficacy standard of 45 lumens per watt, effective beginning January 1, 2020, the Secretary shall prohibit the sale of any general service lamp that does not meet a minimum efficacy standard of 45 lumens per watt.

No provision of EISA can preclude California or Nevada from adopting, effective beginning on or after January 1, 2018; in the case of California, if a final rule has not been adopted, any California regulations relating to these covered products adopted pursuant to State statute in effect as of the date of enactment of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

General Service Incandescent Lamp Standards 2





Modified Spectrum General Service Incandescent Lamp Standards 3


2 GENERAL SERVICE INCANDESCENT LAMP means a standard incandescent or halogen type lamp that is intended for general service applications; has a medium screw base; has a lumen range of not less than 310 lumens and not more than 2,600 lumens; and is capable of being operated at a voltage range at least partially within 110 and 130 volts.

3 MODIFIED SPECTRUM means, with respect to an incandescent lamp, an incandescent lamp that is not a colored incandescent lamp; and when operated at the rated voltage and wattage of the incandescent lamp has a color point with (x,y) chromaticity coordinates on the Commission Internationale de l-Eclairage (C.I.E.) 1931 chromaticity diagram that lies below the black-body locus; and has a color point with (x,y) chromaticity coordinates on the C.I.E. 1931 chromaticity diagram that lies at least 4 MacAdam steps (as referenced in IESNA LM16) distant from the color point of a clear lamp with the same filament and bulb shape, operated at the same rated voltage and wattage.

3 The standards apply to each lamp that is intended for a general service or general illumination application (whether incandescent or not); has a medium screw base or any other screw base not defined in ANSI C81.61-2006; is capable of being operated at a voltage at least partially within the range of 110 to 130 volts; and is manufactured or imported after December 31, 2011.

4 Covered lamps shall have a color rendering index that is greater than or equal to 80 for non-modified spectrum lamps; or 75 for modified spectrum lamps.

5 The Secretary is obligated to consider phased-in effective dates for these potential revisions after considering the impact of any amendment on manufacturers, retiring and repurposing existing equipment, stranded investments, labor contracts, workers, and raw materials; and the time needed to work with retailers and lighting designers to revise sales and marketing strategies.

6 In the case of any portion of any regulation that establishes requirements for general service incandescent lamps, intermediate base incandescent lamps, or candelabra base lamps, enacted or adopted by the State of California or Nevada before December 4, 2007, except that the regulation adopted by the California Energy Commission with an effective date of January 1, 2008, shall only be effective until the effective date of the Federal standard for the applicable lamp category. The States of California and Nevada may, at any time, modify or adopt a State standard for general service lamps to conform with Federal standards with effective dates no earlier than 12 months prior to the Federal effective dates, at which time any prior regulations adopted by the State of California or Nevada shall no longer be effective; and all other States may, at any time, modify or adopt a State standard for general service lamps to conform with Federal standards and effective dates.

7 As in above, the Secretary must consider phased-in effective dates after considering the impact of any amendment on manufacturers, retiring and repurposing existing equipment, stranded investments, labor contracts, workers, and raw materials; and the time needed to work with retailers and lighting designers to revise sales and marketing strategies.

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